Temari with elongated kiku flowers tutorial

A couple of days ago Judy asked for the directions of how to make a temari with slightly modified and elongated kiku flowers. Here is a tutorial!

Green modified kiku temari

Start with a temari base (I chose the orange ball today) and divide it into eight sectors (Simple 8, S8 division) with an obi center line. Here is a great tutorial on how to do it.

Balls for temari embroidery Continue reading »

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Green-orange kiku temari

I picked the idea for this mari from my summer workshop sensei. The design is a very simple modified kiku pattern with kiku “petals” varying in length.

Green modified kiku temari

This is the first temari I embroidered in thin satin thread, which was quite a challenge in itself. Anyway the result was worth it! More images: Continue reading »

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A Star Is Born temari

A Star Is Born temariThis temari is stitched only in swirls (with a bit of black wrapping around the center line). In the making this ball proved to be not quite as simple as I imagined it to be. The name, A Star Is Born, comes from the colors that start from black center (cosmos) and move on to orange dots (new stars) on poles.

Division: S12 (could be made on any simple division or actually without any division at all)

More pictures: Continue reading »

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Blue Mitsubishi temari

Intersection of the squares, made with masu stitches, form the Mitsubishi pattern (“three diamonds”). This pattern is said to be very masculine, which is indeed proved by my husband, who likes this ball more than my beloved intricate chrysanthemum designs (though the latter took much longer to stitch and were quite a pain).

Blue mitsubishi temari

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Common division types in temari marking

S8 marked temariBefore you start stitching a pattern on your mari you have to mark it into a division.

The process of marking is one of the most dull and yet important steps in making a good temari. The geometrical beauty of the finished ball depends directly on the preciseness of your marking (in web-design I would add !important modifier to every word, but in text I’ll stick to bold letters).

Marking is made with marking threads (jiwari), that are traditionally metallic, but can also be the same as design treads. You can even make the division invisible (but non inexistent!) by using the thread similar in color to the ball base.

There are two basic types of divisions: simple and combination (complex). Continue reading »

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